Maths

Mathematics is a creative and highly inter-connected discipline that is essential to everyday life.  A high quality Mathematics education therefore provides a foundation for understanding of the world, the ability to reason mathematically and a sense of enjoyment for the subject.

AIMS

As a maintained school in England, we are legally required to follow the statutory national curriculum which sets out programmes of study and subject content for each year group in Mathematics.  The National Curriculum for Mathematics aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils have conceptual understanding and are able to recall and apply their knowledge rapidly and accurately to problem;

  • reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language;

  • can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

At Langney Primary School, we have produced a Mathematics Progression Tool which outlines statutory requirements and expectations for the end of each year, from Years 1 to 6, in the following strands:

  • Number and Place Value

  • Addition and Subtraction

  • Multiplication and Division

  • Ratio and Proportion (Year 6)

  • Algebra (Year 6)

  • Fractions (including decimals and percentages for Years 4 to 6)

  • Measurement

  • Geometry – Properties of Shape

  • Geometry – Position and Direction

  • Statistics (Years 2 to 6)

LONG TERM PLANNING TOOL

Langney Primary School follows its Long Term Planning Tool to ensure progression of key concepts in Mathematics from the Foundation Stage to Year 6.  The purpose of this booklet is to outline the expected progression for each year group from the new framework for mathematics.  It is used to ensure the correct pitch of lessons is achieved alongside suitable differentiation for learning.

MEDIUM TERM OVERVIEWS

Langney’s Mathematics Medium Term Overviews are a planning document to map out mathematics teaching for the academic year.  It organises the year groups’ objectives and curriculum coverage on a termly basis.  The order of the units must be maintained in sequence as concepts build upon each other week by week.

MATHEMATICAL VOCABULARY

The Mathematical Vocabulary Tool has been developed to identify the key mathematical words and phrases that children need to understand and use or apply if they are to make good progress in their mathematics.  The tool clearly sets out a bank of key vocabulary that should be taught and explored in each year group, in order to meet the demands of the latest curriculum.

The national curriculum for mathematics reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum.  The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their mathematical vocabulary and presenting a mathematical justification, argument or proof.  They must be assisted in making their thinking clear to themselves as well as others.

WRITTEN CALCULATION METHODS FOR ADDITION, SUBTRACTION, MULTIPLICATION and DIVISION

Our school Calculation Policy contains the key pencil and paper procedures that are taught at Langney Primary School. It has been written to ensure consistency and progression throughout the school and reflects a whole school agreement.  the policy is presented as the four calculation areas of AdditionSubtraction, Multiplication and Division

 

The policy is organised into year groups, from Reception to Year 6, and makes explicit links to the end of year expectations for each year group as stated in the National Curriculum. To support the aims of this new curriculum and the increasing emphasis on problem solving and reasoning, our calculation policy encourages a breadth and depth of understanding of each written method in preparation for the following year’s objectives.

During their time at Langney, children will be encouraged to see mathematics as both a written and spoken language. Teachers will support and guide children through the following important stages:

 

  • Developing the use of models and images to represent numerical activities;

  • Using standard symbols and conventions;

  • Use of jottings to aid a mental strategy

  • Use of extended pencil and paper methods.

 

Although the focus of the policy is on pencil and paper procedures, it is important to recognise that the ability to calculate mentally lies at the heart of developing a conceptual understanding of the four operations. Children need to understand what the operations mean rather than just have a procedural method they can follow to reach an answer. This fuller understanding will give the children the confidence to make links between different areas of mathematics, (e.g. understanding what the terms multiply and divide really mean, supports children’s initial work with fractions). It will also support children in estimating, recognising obvious errors and when moving on to more complex numbers and operations.

 

However mental calculation is not at the exclusion of written recording and should be seen as complementary to and not as separate from it. In every written method there is an element of mental processing. Sharing written methods with the teacher encourages children to think about the mental strategies that underpin them and develop new ideas. Therefore written recording both helps children to clarify their thinking and supports and extends the development of more fluent and sophisticated mental strategies.

MENTAL MATHS FLUENCY PASSPORTS

 

Our mental maths fluency passport is bespoke and unique to Langney and was designed to support our children in meeting one of the fundamental aims of the new National Curriculum:

 

“To become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasingly complex problems over time, so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.”

 

By using the passports, our children will be exposed to the relevant mental maths objectives for their year group. These have been lifted directly from the new National Curriculum and the Primary National Strategy document, ‘Teaching Children To Calculate Mentally.’  

 

Our passport is organised into the seven world continents with each representing a specific strand of mental maths:

  1. Europe - Number and place value

  2. Asia - Addition and Subtraction

  3. Africa - Doubling and Halving

  4. Australasia - Multiplication

  5. Antarctica - Division

  6. South America - Properties of number

  7. North America - Fractions, decimals and percentages

Our children work through the specific mental maths objectives for their year group looking for opportunities to use and apply their strategies to promote a breadth and depth of understanding, rather than moving on to the next year’s objectives. To ensure learning is personalised and targeted, teachers have access to the objectives for all year groups within  our passport and can adapt and differentiate their planning accordingly based on the needs of their children.

PROBLEM SOLVING AND REASONING

 

At Langney, we promote a love of learning and encourage our children to demonstrate curiosity, asking questions to push the boundaries of their own learning. To support our children in meeting the final two aims of the new National Curriculum in Maths:

  • To reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language;

  • To solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of routine and non-routine problems with increasing sophistication, including breaking down problems into series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions. 

We teach problem solving strategies and skills explicitly in a weekly investigation lesson and through daily ‘greater depth challenges’ which give our children the opportunity to apply the skills they have learnt in their lessons to new contexts.

From Reception through to Year 6, our children are introduced to and practise the following eight problem solving strategies in a range of imaginative and challenging investigations:

  1. Acting out the problem

  2. Using trial and error

  3. Using trial and improvement

  4. Pattern spotting

  5. Simplifying the problem

  6. Working backwards

  7. Using a table or a list

  8. Using algebra

 

Through the teaching of these eight strategies, our children develop confidence, perseverance and resilience, skills which will help them to become lifelong learners beyond the classroom.